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CELEBRATING CREATIVE EXPRESSION AT BAYLOR SINCE 1966

Periaktoi Writing Post

Volume 53
Issue 2

Single Visual Art Post

  • Essay
Epilogue to The Outsiders
Madison Kay Tuder

On the taxi ride home for Christmas, I had only two things on my mind the gang and staying gold for Johnny. It has been a full five months since I’ve seen the gang. Soda Pop comes to see me every other month-Two-Bit drives him up here. Two-Bit got his car fixed around two years ago. He told jokes until he saved up enough money to get his car fixed. I ain’t seen Darry in a really long time. I haven’t completely gotten over losing Johnny and Dally. I’ve defiantly gotten better. They’ve been gone for about three years now. I didn’t have such a hard time losing Dally.

But losing Johnny hurt real bad. He was a real buddy of mine. I’ve done my best to stay gold. I studied real hard-was valedictorian-got a full ride to Yale for education. I think I want to become a writer. I realized that right after I turned in my English theme. Then it hit me like a train- Soda dropped out of school, and mom and dad died around three years ago. My eyes started watering and I almost started crying. I took one huge breath. Stay strong Pony Boy I told my self.

I hurriedly grabbed my copy of “Gone with the Wind” that Johnny had bought me when we ran away. I had forgotten about Johnny’s note that he had handwritten to me in the book. I opened the cover and saw Johnny’s beautiful handwriting. I read it aloud softly to myself. I got about halfway through the note and completely lost it. I was sobbing real bad-I couldn’t even see. I remembered Johnny’s jet black hair and how he greased it and combed it to the side. His big black eyes on his dark tanned face. How his father would beat him. If I’m being honest I don’t really think his folks cared that he was dead. I was crying so hard now I thought my eyes were gonna fall out. I’ve given up the whole greaser look. I still slick my hair back a little though.

I tried to calm down by thinking about the giant chocolate cake Darry would make for our Christmas dinner with the gang and the giant glasses of chocolate milk that we would have with the cake. I thought about how much I’ve missed Darry these past few months. I dragged out a cancer stick, lit it, and rolled down the window just a bit. I still feel bad for running away when Darry hit me. I know he didn’t mean to. I could see his pale blue-green ice-like eyes looking at me when I saw him for the first time after he hit me. I could feel his strong, muscular arms squeezing me. I feel awful about running away. If I wouldn’t have run away-Johnny would have never died- if Johnny wouldn’t have died then Dally wouldn’t have died.

It’s been hard without Dally around. I feel bad for him. He’s been in and out of the cooler since he was ten. Dally always hated the law so he broke it. I remember the night he asked for Two-Bit’s switchblade. He died with that switchblade. Two-Bit hated that he didn’t get his switchblade back. He bought a new a few weeks after Dally died. Two-Bit kept on cracking his jokes. He never takes a break from them for nothing. After he got enough money to fix his car from performing on the streets-he got a full-time job as a comedian at a Friday night club. Soda goes to see him every time he performs. Unless he’s working at the gas station with Steve. Soda and Steve split around forty bucks a day. Soda’s thrilled with his job. Soda’s always been there

for me. I know that I can call him at any time from a pay phone just to talk. Darry and I haven’t fought to bad since Soda ran away. The taxi driver opened the piece of glass between me and him.

“We’re about fifteen minutes away,” he said without even looking at me. He glanced into his mirror and saw me sobbing.

“You all right kid,” he asked me. I took one big deep breath and sniffled a few times.

“Yeah, I think so,” I slowly choked out.

“Who you going to see,” he asked me in the most comforting voice

“My brothers and my gang-well at-least what’s left of it,” I said I was almost in tears again.

“I sorry to hear that kid. Are you from around here?” He asked me curiously.

“Yeah, I lived here in Tulsa, Oklahoma for as long as I can remember. Darry-my brother-takes care of Soda Pop and I,” I told him.

“Wait!” He slammed on the breaks, “You’re Soda Pop Curtis’ little brother?” he asked me very loud.

“Yeah, I miss him real bad,” I started crying again.

“Cheer up kid. I’m sure he’ll be happy to see you. He and I were in the same grade at school. Till he dropped out. I’ve missed him,” I looked at him again. He didn’t look Soda’s age at all, “We’re here,” he half shouted.

“Thank you for the ride,” I said as I was halfway out of the car. I ran up to see my brothers and the gang. Soda Pop, Darry, and I all gave each other giant bear hugs. After I got out of the taxi I had not two things on my mind the gang and staying gold.